Prepared To Teach

Resources & Tools

Prepared To Teach creates and publishes resources for districts, preparation programs, and schools looking to shift towards sustainably funded, high-quality teacher preparation. All of our resources are licensed under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA; we hope they prove useful to our colleagues everywhere.

Resources and tools are organized into the following categories:

Presentation Materials

  • Transforming the Teacher Development Trajectory

    Transforming the Teacher Development TrajectoryTransforming the Teacher Development Trajectory

    Teacher preparation should serve as an on-ramp for aspiring teachers, not a hurdle to be jumped en route to the classroom. Residencies based on deep partnerships create supportive structures that give candidates the resources they need to be successful while deepening the culture of teaching and learning for all of the educators involved in the preparation process.

    View Infographic

  • Our Quality Principles for Teacher Preparation

    Our Quality Principles for Teacher Preparation

    Teacher preparation quality frameworks share many features, even as aspects of how to define and measure quality remain contested. For Prepared To Teach, we conceptualize quality around four non-negotiable tenets that should be present in addition to commonly accepted quality principles, such as continuous improvement and alignment with standards.

    View Document (pdf)

  • A Working Definition of Teacher Residencies

    A Working Definition of Teacher Residencies

    Prepared To Teach has built a working definition of residencies that highlights key features of strong residencies from research and practice from across the country. It offers a framework for thinking about program curriculum, structural principles, and co-design approaches to meet local needs.

    View Document (pdf)

  • Roles for Candidates in Classrooms

    Roles for Candidates in ClassroomsRoles for Candidates in Classrooms

    This animated PowerPoint presentation shows different models for integrating aspiring teachers into the classroom to help with instruction while furthering their own learning. With more than a dozen examples, it’s a helpful starting point for partnerships seeking to shift towards a more cohesive P-20 education system.

    View PowerPoint (ppt)

  • Forming and Sustaining an Advisory Group

    Forming and Sustaining an Advisory Group

    This slide deck outlines the basics of forming an effective advisory group to develop a strong residency partnership. By developing trust and collaborating on shared, mutually beneficial work, advisory groups can support both short-term and long-term partnership goals. The presentation includes supplementary notes on many slides.

    View PowerPoint (ppt)

Reallocation

  • Using ESSER Funds to Support Teacher Residencies

    Snapshot of the ESSER logic model for teacher residencies included in this resource.Using ESSER Funds to Support Teacher Residencies

    Residencies are eligible for federal ESSER dollars. This document offers the research base and a logic model that districts can use to plan their use of ESSER dollars to support residencies. Long-term, using ESSER funding to establish residencies that address areas with high teacher turnover will result in financial sustainability for residencies. In all cases, well-designed residencies will improve instruction and educational outcomes for students.

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  • The ESSA Opportunity for Residencies

    The ESSA Opportunity for ResidenciesThe ESSA Opportunity for Residencies

    Residencies are eligible for all state and local funding because they fulfill the needs of P-12 students in meaningful ways—teacher residents lower student/teacher ratios, provide valuable small-group instruction, and support high-needs groups of students. In addition, federal dollars where they exist can support residencies. Prepared To Teach clarified guidance from the DOE to identify how federal funding can be applied to residency pathways. This brief document gives guidance on how districts can use these opportunities to integrate a pipeline of quality teachers and support school improvement initiatives.

    View Document

  • Roles for Candidates in Classrooms

    Roles for Candidates in ClassroomsRoles for Candidates in Classrooms

    This animated PowerPoint presentation shows different models for integrating aspiring teachers into the classroom to help with instruction while furthering their own learning. With more than a dozen examples, it’s a helpful starting point for partnerships seeking to shift towards a more cohesive P-20 education system.

    View PowerPoint (ppt)

  • Substitute Teaching Models

    Substitute Teaching Models

    Residents can be integrated into substitute teaching roles in a number of different ways. This table from Simple Shifts: Paying Aspiring Teachers With Existing Resources describes various models for resident substitute teaching along with considerations and benefits for partnerships.

    View Table (pdf)

  • Integrating Residencies into Substitute Teaching

    Roles for Residents to Unlock FundingIntegrating Residencies into Substitute Teaching

    This one-page document illustrates the possibilities and benefits of having residents take on substitute teaching roles in a district. Dollars previously allocated to substitute teaching can be redirected toward candidate stipends while substitute teaching needs are largely met by the cohort of residents.

    View Infographic

  • Exploring District Investments in Residencies

    Exploring District Investments in Residencies

    This one-page document illustrates ways school districts can adjust existing funding streams to support teacher candidates during their residency year. Examples of include substitute teaching days for residents, professional development opportunities, and co-teaching alongside mentor teachers.

    View Infographic

  • P-12 Residency Funding Calculator

Reinvestment

  • Using ESSER Funds to Support Teacher Residencies

    Snapshot of the ESSER logic model for teacher residencies included in this resource.Using ESSER Funds to Support Teacher Residencies

    Residencies are eligible for federal ESSER dollars. This document offers the research base and a logic model that districts can use to plan their use of ESSER dollars to support residencies. Long-term, using ESSER funding to establish residencies that address areas with high teacher turnover will result in financial sustainability for residencies. In all cases, well-designed residencies will improve instruction and educational outcomes for students.

    View Document

  • The ESSA Opportunity for Residencies

    The ESSA Opportunity for ResidenciesThe ESSA Opportunity for Residencies

    Residencies are eligible for all state and local funding because they fulfill the needs of P-12 students in meaningful ways—teacher residents lower student/teacher ratios, provide valuable small-group instruction, and support high-needs groups of students. In addition, federal dollars where they exist can support residencies. Prepared To Teach clarified guidance from the DOE to identify how federal funding can be applied to residency pathways. This brief document gives guidance on how districts can use these opportunities to integrate a pipeline of quality teachers and support school improvement initiatives.

    View Document

  • P-12 Residency Funding Calculator
  • Cost Savings for Long-Term Sustainability

    Immediate Cost Savings Through Better Teacher PreparationCost Savings for Long-Term Sustainability

    Recruiting, hiring, and onboarding new teachers is a major expense for districts across the country. Filling a vacancy in an urban school costs about $20,000—and most districts hire tens, if not hundreds, of new teachers each year. Often, those vacancies are caused by early-career teachers who leave after a year or two. Since residency-trained teachers stay in their positions longer, districts can reduce spending on turnover by hiring from a pipeline of residents. Over time, savings on recruitment and hiring costs can help sustain the residency program and create a self-renewing investment in teachers.

    View Infographic

Reduction

  • Strong Program Financial Aid Website Examples

    There’s no one perfect way to design the financial aid portion of a preparation program’s website, but there are lots of great examples of effectively designed sites. Below are links to and descriptions of strong website features.

  • Supporting Candidates' Financial Needs

    Supporting Candidates’ Financial Needs

    This document takes the affordability lessons found in our report, The Affordability Imperative: Creating Equitable Access to Quality Teacher Preparation, and offers preparation program leaders a set of guiding questions to help them find more ways to reduce the financial burdens of their aspiring teachers.

    View Document (pdf)

  • Mini Calculators for Program Costs and Structures
  • Program Cost Tool

    Program Cost Tool

    For a comprehensive look at a program budget, this Excel-based tool will estimate five years of costs and potential savings to assist in your immediate and long-term planning. Administrators or program leaders might find this especially helpful for considering shifts in teacher preparation programming.

    View Guide    Download Tool

Building Ownership & Engagement

  • Creating Mutually Beneficial Partnerships

    Creating Mutually Beneficial Partnerships

    Two people living in different apartments pay separate rent and invest in separate furnishings. But when they move into a shared apartment, rent and furnishings become mutual responsibilities and benefits—each person sees a decrease in monthly rent, and they also have access to some extra resources, like a TV or stereo. Those benefits might come with some compromises or extra responsibilities, but each person sees long-term savings in return. Districts and preparation programs can take a similar approach to partnerships for residencies. When relationships are based in mutual trust and shared goals, all parties benefit.

  • Introduction to Creating a Strong, Inclusive Advisory Group

    Introduction to Creating a Strong, Inclusive Advisory Group

    Designing a residency requires attention to both long-term and short-term planning processes, all of which should be overseen by an inclusive group of stakeholders. By working together, advisory boards can develop expectations for the program and quality placement sites for residents. This video shares Prepared To Teach’s perspective on creating a strong, inclusive advisory board to guide your work.

  • Forming and Sustaining an Advisory Group

    Forming and Sustaining an Advisory Group

    This slide deck outlines the basics of forming an effective advisory group to develop a strong residency partnership. By developing trust and collaborating on shared, mutually beneficial work, advisory groups can support both short-term and long-term partnership goals. The presentation includes supplementary notes on many slides.

    View PowerPoint (ppt)

  • Preparation Program and District Partnership Agreement Considerations

    Preparation Program and District Partnership Agreement ConsiderationsPreparation Program and District Partnership Agreement Considerations

    This document outlines key considerations to keep in mind when building a residency partnership. Articulating agreements can help clarify the responsibilities of each party—programs and schools or districts—as well as foster a shared understanding of the mutual goals and responsibilities the partnership wishes to embrace. Agreements can remain informal or can form the basis for a formal Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). See a sample MOU below.

    View Document

  • Sample Residency Partnership Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)

    Sample Residency Partnership Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)

    This residency partnership sample MOU can be edited and adapted in ways that best fit local partnerships’ needs and goals. The MOU includes collaborative goals and shared responsibilities, followed by specific program and district responsibilities.

    View Sample

  • Resident Expectations and Agreements

    Resident Expectations and Agreements

    This document outlines expectations that residency programs might want to make explicit for those who will be enrolling in the residency. Many of these considerations also would be included in formal agreements between individual residents and preparation partnerships, for example when residents must agree to serve as teachers in a district in exchange for receiving funding during the program. A sample agreement that incorporates these considerations is available below.

    View Guidance (pdf)

  • Sample Formal Resident Agreement

    Sample Formal Resident Agreement

    This sample Resident Commitment Agreement is a skeleton for partnerships to use and edit in ways that best fit their needs. This formal contract model not only embeds expectations for the residency but also sets out terms for residents’ receipt of financial supports during the residency, such as agreements to take positions in a district once they have completed the program.

    View Sample