Occasional Paper Series

Call for Papers

  • Issue #50

    Occasional Paper Series #50: Treescapes of the Future

    **The due date for submissions has been extended to January 15, 2023**

    Young children playing in treesIn this issue of the Bank Street Occasional Paper Series, we will explore treescapes as spaces of connection, belonging, and learning. We use the term ‘treescapes’ to describe a range of tree-related settings including parks, forests, playgrounds, streets with trees on them, or any other place that has trees embedded in the landscape. We see treescapes as spaces of possibility and part of the hope for the future.

    Trees are vital for the present and future health of the planet, its inhabitants, and ecosystems. In this special issue, we hope to hear the voices of children and young people, educators, parents, activists, policymakers, and researchers about the vital importance of treescapes. How can treescapes be understood? Increased? Recognized and appreciated? What experiences do we have to share of planting trees, learning from trees, and becoming entangled with trees? How can educators learn to re-invigorate a focus on trees for the future?

    Recognizing that children and young people have been less visible in discussions about the need for future treescapes, we will highlight the critical need for pedagogy and curricula worldwide focusing on how trees are central to surviving the climate crisis. We note too that urban young people’s engagement with future treescapes is often unacknowledged. We are interested in how a lens that includes migrant/refugee background, socio-economic status, geographic location, linguistic diversity, race, and ethnicity can enhance our understanding of belonging in treescapes.

    Acknowledging the dominance of Global North discourses of treescapes, we hope to hear about connections and a sense of belonging within treescapes from people living across the globe and encourage submissions from the Global South. We recognize that land ownership is contested and would like to know about spaces where treescape work has been innovative and created communal spaces of belonging. We seek essays that focus on activism, creativity, and ways of belonging in treescapes.

    Examples of questions that prospective authors may pursue:

    1. What opportunities and challenges do treescapes offer children and youth for learning, belonging, and hope?
    2. How do children and young people understand and engage with treescapes?
    3. How can the voices of children and young people be amplified within treescape management?
    4. How can curricula and pedagogy support the development of a social justice matrix that supports children’s and youth’s engagement with treescapes, pushes back against norms of land ownership, and/or creates new architectures of belonging?
    5. What stories can we tell each other about treescapes? How can treescapes be storied across generations?

    Manuscripts Due: January 15, 2023

    We are seeking essays ranging from 3,000 to 5,000 words, double spaced, and formatted in APA 7th edition style. Papers lacking APA formatting will not be reviewed. We welcome submissions from children and young people, researchers, teachers, school administrators, and others. We are also interested in short films, audio essays, photo essays, and small-scale artistic products. Only unpublished manuscripts that are not under review by other publications are eligible for consideration. For more information or if you would like to discuss ideas, please contact guest editors Kate Pahl and Samyia Ambreen via Kate Pahl at K.Pahl@mmu.ac.uk.

    Submission Guidelines

  • Issue #51

    Occasional Paper Series #51: Reconceptualizing Quality Early Care and Education with Equity at the Center

    Two children playing with plastic cups

    The Bank Street Occasional Paper Series is seeking manuscripts and creative works that illustrate new ways of defining and documenting quality in early care and education (ECE). This issue is committed to representing and amplifying too-often silenced voices and perspectives in ECE: racially and otherwise minoritized children, parents, educators, program leaders, policymakers, and researchers who strive to do things differently. This call particularly encourages multimedia submissions, such as children’s work and narratives, parents’ accounts, or dialogues among educators (e.g., audio recordings, photo essays, short video, and so forth).

    At its heart, this issue takes the hopeful stance that one barrier to rethinking quality in ECE is our lack of imagination—not because imaginative examples do not exist, but rather because those in decision-making positions in programs, professional organizations, and government agencies are often not aware that alternatives exist. A key corollary to this lack of awareness is an abundance of criticism but few specific recommendations for how to remake systems to support culturally, linguistically, and disabilities-affirming approaches in ECE.

    A renewed focus on quality in ECE is needed for at least two reasons. First, quality in ECE is often treated as if there is a settled, universally agreed upon definition. A central claim of many early childhood advocates today is that high-quality programming is foundational to righting inequities among young children. However, analyses of dominant approaches have not shown strong or consistent connections between prevailing quality indicators and children’s development or learning, let alone fostering equity (Burchinal et al., 2011; Guerrero-Rosada et al., 2021; Kagan, 2009; Perlman et al., 2016; Zaslow et al., 2011).

    Second, early in the global COVID-19 pandemic there was a rising chorus of voices calling for reimagining education (Souto-Manning et al., 2020; UNESCO, 2020). In a widely circulated essay, Arundhati Roy (2020) reminded us that,

    Historically, pandemics have forced humans to break with the past and imagine their world anew. This one is no different. It is a portal, a gateway between one world and the next.

    We can choose to walk through it, dragging the carcasses of our prejudice and hatred, our avarice, our data banks and dead ideas, our dead rivers and smoky skies behind us. Or we can walk through lightly, with little luggage, ready to imagine another world. And ready to fight for it. (para., 48-49)

    Her charge was taken up by the Bank Street Occasional Paper Series in Issue 46, “The Pandemic as a Portal: On Transformative Ruptures and Possible Futures for Education” (Souto-Manning et al., 2020). This issue accepts the baton handoff from the authors of Issue 46, acknowledging that while the portal may be closing, it is not yet shut.

    This issue builds on longstanding calls to reconceptualize quality in ECE (see, Dahlberg et al., 1999) and has the dual purpose of providing illustrations of possibility and recommendations for decision-makers (spanning local programs to government agencies). Towards this aspiration, submissions may address:

    1. Core problems-in-practice from different vantage points, such as:
      1. Discussions of conceptual problems and how they impact practice—quality and equity according to whom?
      2. Limitations in current measurement and the field’s deep desire for quantification (Labaree, 2011)
      3. The pressures to scale up (Tobin, 2005b)
      4. Teachers’ experiences of being surveilled (repeatedly)
    2. Illustrations of alternate practices and exemplars of possibility, including from transnational contexts
      1. Justice-centered measurement and other approaches to documenting quality
      2. Culturally and linguistically grounded, inclusive approaches
      3. Centering children’s, families’, and other local perspectives (Hallam et al., 2009; Tobin, 2005a, 2005b)
      4. Reconstituting the relationships between researchers, educators, and policy practitioners; (e.g., Coburn et al., 2013; Yelland & Franz Bentley, 2018)
      5. Movement-building for equitable ECE systems (advocating for new policies and practices; e.g., Nagasawa et al., 2023)

    Manuscripts Due: June 1, 2023

    We are seeking essays ranging from 3,000 to 5,000 words, double spaced, and formatted in APA 7th edition style. Papers lacking APA formatting will not be reviewed. We welcome submissions from children and young people, researchers, teachers, school administrators, and others. We are also interested in short films, audio essays, photo essays, and small-scale artistic products. Only unpublished pieces that are not under review by other publications are eligible for consideration. For more information or if you would like to discuss ideas, please contact guest editor Mark Nagasawa at mnagasawa@bankstreet.edu and Cristina Medellin-Paz at cmedellin@bankstreet.edu.

    Submission Guidelines

    References

    Burchinal, M. R., Kainz, K., & Cai, Y. (2011). How well are our measures of quality predicting to child outcomes: A meta-analysis and coordinated analyses of data from large scale studies of early childhood settings. In M. Zaslow, I. Martinez-Beck, K. Tout & T. Halle (Eds.), Measuring quality in early childhood settings (pp. 11-31). Brookes Publishing.

    Coburn, C. E., Penuel, W., & Geil, K. E. (2013). Research-practice partnerships: A strategy for leveraging research for educational improvement in school districts. William T. Grant Foundation.

    Dahlberg, G., Moss, P., & Pence, A. (1999). Beyond quality in early childhood education and care: Postmodern perspectives. Routledge.

    Guerrero-Rosada, P., Weiland, C., McCormick, M., Hsueh, J., Sachs, J., Snow, C., & Maier, M. (2021). Null relations between CLASS scores and gains in children’s language, math, and executive function skills: A replication and extension study. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 54(1), 1-12.

    Hallam, R., Fouts, H., Bargreen, K., & Caudle, L. (2009). Quality from a toddler’s perspective: A bottom-up examination of classroom experiences. Early Childhood Research & Practice, 11(2), https://ecrp.illinois.edu/v11n2/hallam.html

    Kagan, S.L. (2009, April). American early childhood education: Preventing or perpetuating inequity? Equity Matters: Research Review No. 3. Campaign for Educational Equity.

    Labaree, D.F. (2011). The lure of statistics for educational researchers. Educational Theory, 61(6), 621-632.

    Nagasawa, M. K., Peters, L. Bloch, M. N., & Swadener, B. B. (Eds.) (2023). Transforming early years policy in the U.S.: A call to action. Teachers College Press.

    Perlman, M., Falenchuk, O., Fletcher, B., McMullen, E., Beyene, J., Shah, P.S. (2016). A systematic review and meta-analysis of a measure of staff/child interaction quality (the Classroom Assessment Scoring System) in early childhood education and care settings and child outcomes. PLoS ONE 11(12): e0167660. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0167660

    Roy, A. (2020, April 3). The pandemic is a portal. Financial Times. https://www.ft.com/content/10d8f5e8-74eb-11ea-95fe-fcd274e920ca

    Souto-Manning, M. et al. (2020). The Pandemic as a Portal: On Transformative Ruptures and Possible Futures for Education. Bank Street Occasional Paper Series, 46. https://www.bankstreet.edu/research-publications-policy/occasional-paper-series/archive/ops-46/

    Tobin, J. J. (2005a). Quality in early childhood education: An anthropologist’s perspective. Early Education & Development, 16, 421-434.

    Tobin J. J. (2005b) Scaling up as catachresis. International Journal of Research & Method in Education, 28(1), 23–32.

    Yelland, N., & Franz Bentley, D. (2018). Found in translation: Connecting reconceptualist thinking with early childhood education practices. Routledge.

    Zaslow, M. J., Tout, K., & Halle, T. (Eds.). (2011). Quality measurement in early childhood settings. Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.